Decisions We Craft

Once the plethora of ideas are discussed, built upon and detailed, you will naturally move to the phase of making key decisions. Rather than unveiling a very detailed set of decisions, it is usually best to outline the major decisions and ask for input on its details. This will naturally lead to more questions and ideas which can be used to add to the details of the decisions. This way, you get the best ideas and input as you put more and more details on the original high level decisions.

One of the biggest challenges I have found in this stage is to gather enough information from the perspective of the customers (both those you are serving and those who will have new roles in better serving the customers). Another issue is the tendency to expand the scope and complexity of the solution when typically 20% of the implementation gets 80% of the improvements. The tools below will help you in making your final decisions. I suggest you again solicit a cross-section of your organization and utilize the tools below to help create meaningful conversations and insights.

.

Customer Needs Mapping helps you identify the processes or options associated with your initiative that will have the most opportunity to positively impact your customers. It also has the added benefit of helping the implementers of this initiative put themselves in the “shoes of the customer.”

.

Process Mapping helps you clarify the differences between the current processes and the future processes in terms of sequencing and responsibilities.


.

Pay-Off Matrix is very useful in prioritizing and narrowing down the effectiveness of options associated with your significant change initiative. It also is helpful in deciding which portions of the initiative will come first.

.

Balanced Measurement Chart will help you be clear about the results you will obtain and anticipated progress toward these results.

.